Anti-corruption programme for project owners

This section applies to both public and private sector project owners.

 

In infrastructure, corruption takes place primarily on specific projects. It can occur in any project phase, including project identification, financing, design, tendering, execution, maintenance and operation.

 

Project owners play a vital role in corruption prevention, as they control the tender and project management mechanisms.  It is, therefore, largely incumbent on the project owner to take the lead in limiting the corruption that takes place on projects. In addition, the project owner and its individual directors and managers are at risk of incurring civil and/or criminal liability, financial loss and reputational damage for involvement in corruption.

 

To minimise the risk of corruption in their projects, project owners should take anti-corruption action by implementing a systematic programme to prevent, detect and address corruption both within their organisation and in the projects themselves.

 

GIACC in this section provides outline recommended actions for project owners to help reduce the risk of corruption.  Links are provided from some actions to other GIACC web-pages which provide more detailed recommendations.

 

 

 


Template: Anti-Corruption Programme

 

  1. Project owners should implement:

    1. An organisational anti-corruption programme designed to prevent, detect and address corruption in relation to the project owner’s activities. (See Anti-corruption programme for organisations which provides requirements, supporting guidance and templates for such a programme).
    2. A project anti-corruption programme designed to prevent, detect and address corruption in relation to the project.  (See Project Anti-Corruption System which provides requirements, supporting guidance and templates for such a programme).

  2. All contractors, consultants, suppliers and other organisations which bid for contracts over a reasonable minimum value threshold on the project should only be permitted to bid if they can provide sufficient proof that they have implemented an organisational anti-corruption programme designed to prevent, detect and address corruption in relation to the organisation’s activities. (See Anti-corruption programme for organisations which provides requirements, supporting guidance and templates for such a programme).

  3. The project owner should: 

    1. Publicly disclose that it is the project owner for a particular project and any employee or third party should be able to report matters of concern in a confidential manner to an appropriate senior manager of the project owner.
    2. Report allegations of corrupt practices in relation to the project to the authorities, and to any applicable trade or professional association.



Most recent update on 17th January 2016

Page first published on 1st May 2008



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